Newsletter – Wedding Styling

 

Emily K Weddings Wedding Styling
Photography by Boho Chic Weddings

 

This month’s newsletter is a little intro about styling your wedding day. This is where my passion lies.

To download the PDF newsletter for ‘on the go’ reading, click here. It’s not long but it’ll give you something to read on your commute.  Or you can sign up to the newsletter to recieve it directly into your inbox.

I love the fact that your wedding day can be styled exactly how you want and done so that it totally reflects you. What I really don’t like is when people say their wedding style is a colour, a shade of blue or Cadbury purple. How can picking a single colour define your style and reflect any part of your personality?!

Na ah, not under my watch, your wedding deserves better than that. I thought I’d share with you a recent table styling so you can see there is so much more to styling your wedding day.

WHITE ELEGANCE at Jervaulx Abbey

My favourite styling so far took place this month with The Alternatives photography workshop. Inspired by the Grecian hanging gardens of Babylon, and set in the beautiful setting of Jervaulx Abbey ruins, I wasn’t totally confident about the different white tones coming together if I’m being honest. My concern was that it would look too plain and lack colour and interest. However, the end result was elegant, modern and most of all, fresh.

 

View More: http://jogreenfieldphotographer.pass.us/oliandlucie
Photography by Jo Greenfield

 

The white tones layered together worked perfectly with the lush greenery from All Bunched Up which gave it more textured detail and colour. The gold cutlery and boxes added a beautifully warm metallic tone. Stationery from A Little Pigment, ribbons from Bertie and Fred and macaroons from Where the Ribbon Ends all added those little details I just adore on a wedding table. Those are the bits that make guests go ooooh and ahhh.

 

Screen Shot 2018-08-29 at 13.38.48A NOTE FROM BYRON…

There’s a new company in town, Bow, Wow, Vow! They take care of dogs at weddings so you can bring your pooch along knowing they’re looked after during and after the vows. Because us dogs love a wedding too you know! Thank you Bow, Wow, Vow for making it possible to be part of our Human’s wedding day.

 

 

HOW TO FIND YOUR WEDDING STYLE?
Some key questions to help you define your wedding style…

 

  • How do you imagine your wedding day? Relaxed, outside, romantic, quirky, fun, casual…
  • What’s your personal style like? Clothes, home, accessories…
  • Is there anything about you as a couple that makes you unique? You got engaged on the beach, you both love Star Wars…
  • What is the venue like? This can often denote the style initially. Barn wedding – rustic. Castle Wedding – opulent, etc.
  • Is there anything that must be included in your wedding that you’ve always thought you’d have when you got married?
  • What makes you cringe or you absolutely hate?  It’s always good to rule things out.

 


Get in touch if you would like to book a free wedding consultation to find out how I can help you with your wedding planning and styling. hello@emilykweddings.com

More of mine and Byron’s daily shinanigens can be found on Instagram,  have a follow @emilykweddings.

 


 

Lovely Suppliers ||

Couple: @lucielowex @olihughes1
Flowers: @all_bunched_up
Ribbons: @bertieandfred
Dress: @meggieandma
Cake: @wheretheribbonends
Jewellery: @london_victorian_ring_co
Stationery: @alittlepigment
Venue: @jervaulxabbey
MUA: @lucyhartmakeupartist
Hair: @hairandmakeupbysaskia
Macrame: @frankie_and_flea
Shoes: @asos
Suit: @asos
Stylist: @emilykweddings
Creative direction: @the_alternatives_ss
Crockery: @whitehouse_crockery

 

Autumn Romance in the Air

Autumn Inspiration
Image Credits
Floral Arch: via Rock My Wedding . Log stack: via The Pretty Blog . Gin Bar: via Rock My Wedding. Bride: via Amber Bridal. Woodland: Fox Tail Photography . Headpiece: via Etsy. Cake: via Rock My Wedding

It occurred to me the other day that I’m missing out on the lovely autumn vibes at home. I love Autumn! I know it’s probably many people’s least favourite but for me I love going for walks in rustling leaves, getting wrapped up and relaxing with a cosy coffee on the sofa. I also love Halloween and Bonfire night. Again, I know some people think these are so commercial now but come on, brighten up the Autumn by embracing the festivities.

Missing Autumn got me thinking about an inspiration board for an Autumn wedding. Most wedding venues get booked up first in the Spring and Summer months, however, if you’re a bride and groom with your hearts set on a certain venue, don’t let the season ruin your plans. Embrace the off season and create a cosy, autumn wedding full of golden tones and texture.

The colour palette for a true autumn style wedding obviously includes the golden and red tones inspired by the leaves. Teamed with a deep blue/ grey tone for an edge and soft natural tones for elegance and lightness. Don’t think that you have to choose one colour for your wedding style, don’t be defined by one colour. Think tonal and creative.

The florals on the board are organic and rustic representing the true nature of autumn. This is repeated in the headpiece which adds colour to the dress and a wild, bohemian texture. The flowing tulle dress has natural movement, again adding the organic free spirit of Autumn vibes.

The lighting and woodland location is soft and romantic. So romantic you are both whisked away when saying your ‘I do’s’. Lost in a moment with each other surrounded by candle light and nature.

The cake and gin bar are rustic focal points. Adorned with detail and foraged fruit. The semi naked cake makes a statement to Autumn and says it’s ok for the wild walks and lazy days. The gin bar in my opinion is always a must and this could adopt spiced gin flavours teamed with blackberries and wild herb garnishes – warming flavours of Autumn as opposed to those light summer blends.

The overall feel for this Autumn styled wedding is relaxed, romantic and intimate. So when your dream venue only has availability in October or November, don’t rule out an inspiring Autumn wedding day. It can be more magical than you expected. (And sometimes cheaper).

If you’re having Pinterest overload or just don’t know where to start with your wedding planning adventure, get in touch to arrange a FREE consultation and find out how I can help you with your dream day no matter how big or small your plans may be.
View my brochure here.

 

Emily x

Pantone Pink Yarrow

Pantone Pink Yarrow

Hello.

Pantone released their top ten colours for Spring / Summer 2017. It seems a long way off but we all know it will come round quickly and we will be planning for weddings for next year over the next few months. The Wedding Academy have launched a competition to all students from all over the globe to submit a colour board based on one of Pantone’s top ten. Below is my interpretation of Pink Yarrow.

pantone-color-swatches-fashion-color-report-fall-2017
Pantone Fashion Colour Report Spring 2017

I decided to choose Pink Yarrow out of the colours above to challenge myself and put a design together using a bright colour. I’m naturally drawn to more subtle toned colours such as the Hazelnut or Pale Dogwood, but I thought, no, do something different. At first I thought the colour was too bright and screamed more Barbie pink, but then I thought actually, who doesn’t love Barbie pink and the ultimately girly colour!

The board represents just that, colourful, fun, vibrant and girly. It’s a strong colour not to be ignored and just lifts your spirits. Mixed with softer pinks and whites as shown on the bard, the pink yarrow really pops out as the focal colour without being overpowering. I’ve now fallen hard for this colour and will be braver when considering bolder, brighter colours in the future. Turns out their not as scary as I first thought!

For more colour boards take a look over at my Inspiration Boards page. 

Emily

pantone-pink-yarrow

Floral Design Through Time

Looking back at the history of floral design can influence and inspire design trends for the future. A unit within my Diploma course explained how floral design has varied and developed over period of time. Below I look at 5 key European floral trends from different eras.

Renaissance

(1400-1600 A.D.)

Design Elements:

Floral motifs Fruit and vegetables

Classic style urns

Woven baskets

Dianthus, daisies, lilies, violets, roses

Floral Design 1
Renaissance

The renaissance style emigrated from Italy throughout Europe. The creative energy and inspiration came from still life paintings which were popular at the time. Fruits and foliage such as olive and ivy were included within arrangements. Designs developed throughout this period to become more and more ornate.

Baroque

(1600 – 1775 AD)

Design Elements: Large, bold flowers

Large metal or glass containers

Ornamental Gladiolus, roses, iris, peony, marigold, branches

Colour Metallics

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Baroque

Moving into the Baroque period meant floral arrangements were becoming much more ornamental and dramatic. Interiors at this time were becoming more lavish and this translated into the floral trends. The style was decadent, flamboyant and dramatic.

Rococo

(1715-1744 AD)

Design Elements:

Tighter, denser arrangements

Taller pieces

Roses, Hydrangeas Delicate glass containers

Soft pinks, whites and gold

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Rococo

In contrast to the exuberant Baroque style, Rococo floral design took influence from the romance of France and designs developed into a more feminine, delicate approach. The shape of arrangements changed to tall, elegant figures. Soft pinks and complimenting pastel colours emphasised the feminine and pretty style within this period.

Georgian

(1714-1810 AD)

Design Elements:

Vibrant colour palettes

Wedgewood urns

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Georgian

There wasn’t much transition from the Rococo period, during the Georgian period floral design remained very similar. Due to the influence in overseas trading, there was an oriental element to some of the designs. The fragrance and herbal symbolism of flowers came into play at the end of this period as well as wearable pieces. Pottery design by Wedgewood introduced more vibrant colour palettes.

Victorian

 (1830-1901 AD)

Design Elements:

Tiny flowers

Posy arrangements

Trinkets, Bell jars Bud vases

Forget me nots, feathers, shells

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Victorian

Flowers in this period became much more fashionable and recognised as a skill and profession. The style adopted a miniature approach with more detailed flowers being the key focus. These were complimented with small trinkets such as feathers, figurines to give a focal point and interest.

Image Credits: Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Georgian, Victorian

 

Emily