Pantone Pink Yarrow

Pantone Pink Yarrow

Hello.

Pantone released their top ten colours for Spring / Summer 2017. It seems a long way off but we all know it will come round quickly and we will be planning for weddings for next year over the next few months. The Wedding Academy have launched a competition to all students from all over the globe to submit a colour board based on one of Pantone’s top ten. Below is my interpretation of Pink Yarrow.

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Pantone Fashion Colour Report Spring 2017

I decided to choose Pink Yarrow out of the colours above to challenge myself and put a design together using a bright colour. I’m naturally drawn to more subtle toned colours such as the Hazelnut or Pale Dogwood, but I thought, no, do something different. At first I thought the colour was too bright and screamed more Barbie pink, but then I thought actually, who doesn’t love Barbie pink and the ultimately girly colour!

The board represents just that, colourful, fun, vibrant and girly. It’s a strong colour not to be ignored and just lifts your spirits. Mixed with softer pinks and whites as shown on the bard, the pink yarrow really pops out as the focal colour without being overpowering. I’ve now fallen hard for this colour and will be braver when considering bolder, brighter colours in the future. Turns out their not as scary as I first thought!

For more colour boards take a look over at my Inspiration Boards page. 

Emily

pantone-pink-yarrow

Floral Design Through Time

Looking back at the history of floral design can influence and inspire design trends for the future. A unit within my Diploma course explained how floral design has varied and developed over period of time. Below I look at 5 key European floral trends from different eras.

Renaissance

(1400-1600 A.D.)

Design Elements:

Floral motifs Fruit and vegetables

Classic style urns

Woven baskets

Dianthus, daisies, lilies, violets, roses

Floral Design 1
Renaissance

The renaissance style emigrated from Italy throughout Europe. The creative energy and inspiration came from still life paintings which were popular at the time. Fruits and foliage such as olive and ivy were included within arrangements. Designs developed throughout this period to become more and more ornate.

Baroque

(1600 – 1775 AD)

Design Elements: Large, bold flowers

Large metal or glass containers

Ornamental Gladiolus, roses, iris, peony, marigold, branches

Colour Metallics

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Baroque

Moving into the Baroque period meant floral arrangements were becoming much more ornamental and dramatic. Interiors at this time were becoming more lavish and this translated into the floral trends. The style was decadent, flamboyant and dramatic.

Rococo

(1715-1744 AD)

Design Elements:

Tighter, denser arrangements

Taller pieces

Roses, Hydrangeas Delicate glass containers

Soft pinks, whites and gold

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Rococo

In contrast to the exuberant Baroque style, Rococo floral design took influence from the romance of France and designs developed into a more feminine, delicate approach. The shape of arrangements changed to tall, elegant figures. Soft pinks and complimenting pastel colours emphasised the feminine and pretty style within this period.

Georgian

(1714-1810 AD)

Design Elements:

Vibrant colour palettes

Wedgewood urns

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Georgian

There wasn’t much transition from the Rococo period, during the Georgian period floral design remained very similar. Due to the influence in overseas trading, there was an oriental element to some of the designs. The fragrance and herbal symbolism of flowers came into play at the end of this period as well as wearable pieces. Pottery design by Wedgewood introduced more vibrant colour palettes.

Victorian

 (1830-1901 AD)

Design Elements:

Tiny flowers

Posy arrangements

Trinkets, Bell jars Bud vases

Forget me nots, feathers, shells

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Victorian

Flowers in this period became much more fashionable and recognised as a skill and profession. The style adopted a miniature approach with more detailed flowers being the key focus. These were complimented with small trinkets such as feathers, figurines to give a focal point and interest.

Image Credits: Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Georgian, Victorian

 

Emily